Julius caesar dramatic devices

Caesar instructs his friend Antony, who is naked in accordance with his duty of "running the course" in a holiday ceremony, to touch Calpurnia as he runs, because tradition holds that infertile women may be cured this way.

Julius caesar dramatic devices

Caesar instructs his friend Antony, who is naked in accordance with his duty of "running the course" in a holiday ceremony, to touch Calpurnia as he runs, because tradition holds that infertile women may be cured this way.

Although Caesar is superstitious, he thinks himself invulnerable. Brutus has no interest in watching the festivities, and says Cassius should go on without him.

Establishes Brutus as thoughtful and deferent, but also stoic and humorless, immediately contrasting him with the vibrant Antony. Active Themes Cassius remarks that Brutus has acted strangely lately, and wonders whether they are still friends.

Foil Definition

Cassius has a knack for manipulating people and controlling conversation. Cassius says that Brutus is greatly admired by all of Rome, and that everyone—"except immortal Caesar" 1.

Brutus wonders why Cassius is trying to make him proud, since he knows vanity would be uncharacteristic of him. Cassius is trying to insinuate that Caesar means to become all-powerful by sarcastically calling him "immortal.

Active Themes They hear cheering, and Brutus says he fears that Caesar is being crowned king. Cassius says that this possibility must displease Brutus, if he fears it.

Active Themes Cassius says that he would rather be dead than bow to Caesar, since Caesar is no better than they.

Julius caesar dramatic devices

Cassius adds that he thinks that it is ironic that Caesar should seem so all-powerful now. Cassius claims to speak for himself, but intends to persuade. He also changes tactics, having previously called Caesar "immortal," then saying Caesar is equal to them, and finally painting him as inferior, even feminine.

Literary Devices in Julius Caesar - Owl Eyes

Active Themes They hear more cheering. Cassius says that they cannot blame fate for their subservient positions: After belittling Caesar, Cassius returns to describing his greatness, which now seems ironic.

He then touches three themes he knows will affect Brutus: Active Themes Cassius is glad his "weak words" 1. Active Themes As he passes in the procession, Caesar tells Antony that Cassius looks too "lean and hungry" 1. Antony says Cassius can be trusted. Caesar says Cassius is too intellectual and cannot enjoy himself, and that such men are to be feared, but quickly points out that he only speaks rhetorically, not personally, because he himself fears nothing.Julius Caesar (or is it Brutus) Foil A character who is in most ways opposite to the main character (protagonist) or one who is nearly the same as the protagonist.

LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in Julius Caesar, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Manhood and Honor Logic and Language.

Read expert analysis on literary devices in Julius Caesar.

Expert Answers

Terms of dramatic devices used in the writings of William Shakespeare. Learn with flashcards, games, and more — for free. Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar begins when Caesar returns to Rome after defeating Pompey.

To help students understand the historical context of the play, it is essential to give them some. In Act 1 Scene II, dramatic irony occurs when the Soothsayer bids to Caesar to “Beware the ides of March” (I.

ii. 20). This is an example of dramatic irony for two reasons.

Julius Caesar Act 1, scene 2 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes